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Jackson Guitars

Jackson have manufactured guitars since the 70’s when Grover Jackson a colleague of Wayne Charvel (Charvel Guitars) who obtained the rights to the Charvel name in 1978. Jackson originally manufactured their instruments in San Dimas but in the mid 1980’s moved their production facility to Ontario when they merged with the International Music Corporation.

Jackson Guitars have benefited from a rich association with many of today’s finest rock musicians including the likes of Rhandy Rhoads, Zakk Wylde. As a result of this association Jackson Guitars retain a high degree of popularity among metal enthusiasts.

Typically with their angled headstocks reminiscent of Gibson Explorer’s and angled bodies – these instruments have a real rock style. Today the Jackson guitar range includes, Flying V (King V), Dinky (Strat style) to name but two. The guitars feature cool colors and unique styles, Duncan humbuckers for solid tone, Floyd rose tremolo systems, Jumbo Frets and super fast fingerboards making it a superb rock instrument.

Gibson Les Paul

The Les Paul was introduced by Gibson in 1952 around the same time as Fender’s Stratocaster and Telecaster. Over the years the Les Paul has become one of the most enduring and popular musical instrument models in the world and along with the Stratocaster and Telecaster is instantly recognizable.

The Les Paul model was designed by the Jazz guitarist Les Paul and the Gibson Company. The 1952 Les Paul featured two single-coil pickups, and a one-piece, ‘trapeze’-style bridge and tailpiece. The Les Paul is a heavy instrument and is famed for it’s sustain and tone. These characteristics are largely due to the Les Paul’s construction and choice of materials.

The new guitar was an expensive response to the seemingly plain, “manufactured” construction of the Stratocaster and Telecaster. Gibson already manufactured hollow-body guitars since the 1930s, but the Les Paul proved a radical move with some contrasting differences between fender models. .

Today’s Les Paul consists of a set neck, 3 on one side tuners, usually two humbucking pickups, and a single cut away body w/ a 3 way pickup selector switch. The Les Paul now comes in many variants Standard, Custom, and Deluxe. Each variant has a choice of finishes and fittings making the instrument wide ranging in it’s the music it can be applied to.

Many recording artists have used the Les Paul, in the 60′s artists such as Eric Clapton and others from the British Blues Bloom realized the potential of the guitar and it became very popular. Today guitarists such as Slash, Joe Perry are widely associated with the instrument.
Gibson Guitars

A Brief History Of Gibson Guitars

By Michael Casamento

 

Gibson guitars have been around forever. It’s funny, but although Gibson has produced some of the most amazing guitars in history, perhaps the company’s largest contribution to music has been through their advancements in pickup technology. Gibson’s first electric guitar the ES-150 was produced in 1936, and is still considered one of the best sounding electric jazz guitars in the world.

In 1946 Gibson introduced the P-90 single coil pickup, which was eventually used on the first Les Paul model in 1952. The Les Paul was Gibson’s first solid body electric guitar. In 1957 Gibson introduced the legendary Humbucker pickup on the Les Paul model, and an instant classic was born. The P-90 and the Humbucker quickly became the pickups of choice for Gibson’s expanding line of solid body electric guitars.

1961 marked the introduction of one of Gibson’s most successful models ever, the double cutaway SG. This was followed by the Firebird, and Flying V models, each a classic in its own right. In addition to electrics, Gibson produces some of the finest acoustic guitars available.

Gibson’s commitment to excellence, and support of top musicians is demonstrated most deeply through its well known Custom Shop. The Custom Shop produces specialty instruments for artists, and discerning musicians. In addition, many well known historic classics have been faithfully reproduced by the Gibson Custom Shop, allowing a whole new generation of guitarists to experience Gibson’s hallmark guitars.

© Written By: Michael Casamento

Michael Casamento is the founder of Guitar Pages Online – a comprehensive resource for guitars and guitar related merchandise on the Internet.

For more information visit:http://www.guitarpagesonline.com

This article may be freely reproduced so long as the above resource box is included in its entirety.
Gibson Guitars

The Gibson SG Guitar

The Gibson SG was initially released in 1961. The guitar was released to improve the Gibson’s sales (Sales of the Les Paul had begun to wane.) The SG has proved very popular and has been in constant production since it’s release.

Initially named the Standard it was renamed SG (Solid guitar) after the first few years of production. It’s design features two “sharp” double cutaways and featured an optional whammy bar. It featured two humbucking pickups a three way selector switch. The guitar has a mahogany body and set neck.

The SG is much lighter than its sibling the Les Paul and features a shallower neck. It is quite a versatile instrument and produces a powerful tone suitable for loud rock solos.

The guitar has been featured with numerous artists such as ACDC’s Angus Young, Tony Iommi. Eric Clapton also used one during his time with the band Cream.
Gibson Guitars

How Gibson Guitars Are Made


By Steve Morgan

 

The Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model is one of their most loved guitars. Players of Gibson guitars often wonder how the great Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model is made. Made in Nashville, Tennessee, the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model is made much like their other models. To begin with, the wood is chosen for the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model. The top of the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model is glued up into 2” thick block, and most of the backs are solid. Machines put the front and backs together for the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model. Most are surprised by the machine assembly of the guitars, however the Gibson Guitar Hummingbird and all other models have been built by machines for over 100 years.

The Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model’s neck is made of up to three different pieces. The pieces of the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird are laminated and cut. The wing blocks are added to the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird and the fingerboards are assembled. Most of the fingerboards on the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird are made of rosewood or ebony. The Gibson Guitar Hummingbird, like all other Gibson guitars, is hand-fretted. When everything is put together, the Gibson Guitar Hummingbird is ready to go.

Many musicians have loved the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird over the years. The Gibson Guitars Hummingbird is one that offers the signature Gibson sound and quality. Durability is one thing that draws artists to the Gibson Guitars Hummingbird. The Gibson Guitars Hummingbird model is a lovely instrument that is also a piece of art.

Steve Morgan makes it quick and easy to find the best guitars. Read expert information here.

Fender Telecaster

The Telecaster was developed by the Fender Guitar company in the late 1940′s. It is a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar. It was first retailed during the early 1950′s and it was the first guitar of its kind to be produced on a substantial scale.

Telecaster’s typically have two pickups, a slightly smaller headstock than the stratocaster, and a 3 way pickup selector.

The Telecaster is known for its bright, cutting tone. The bridge pickup is placed at a slant and this helps enhance the guitar’s treble tone. These sound of the Telecaster allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. Telecasters are sometimes fitted with a string bending device that enables a smooth change of pitch reminiscent of a lapsteel guitar.

Many Telecasters have a string through body, and it’s has a unique ‘tele’ sound when the middle position on the pickup selector is selected. This activates both pickups and give that unique telecaster sound.

Many famous guitarists have played the telecaster from Prince through to Bruce Springsteen including a plethora of country players.

Why Choose an Epiphone Guitar?

In recent years Epiphone Guitars have been seen as entry level guitars generally based on their more expensive Gibson relations however that is a misconception and there is more to the Epiphone family than initially meets the eye.

The Epiphone guitar company has, in fact, a rich heritage going back almost a hundred years many of which manufacturing guitars independently of Gibson. The Epiphone company was bought by Gibson’s parent company Chicago Musical Instuments in 1957.

The Epiphone brand has produced many fine guitars during it’s time. These have ranged from solid body Guitars such those reminiscent of the Les Paul to Archtops such as the Casino. It wasn’t until the 1980’s that Epiphone started producing stripped down versions of Gibson classics such as the Les Paul or the Explorer.

So now we’ve explained where Epiphone comes from what makes them great? And what’s the difference between Gibson and Epiphone?

One of the reasons that makes Epiphone’s so great is that they have such a rich heritage – they have been making quality guitars for years. This means that you can expect a certain level of build quality from their Korean manufacturers. Fit and finish tend to be excellent meaning that the guitars also look the business.

Epiphone guitars are built to a high standard but do differ from their Gibson counterparts. They tend to be made in the far-east rather than the USA, use lower grade woods or laminates and have differing electronics and hardware.

For the beginner these differences are inconsequential but for the professional it may mean that some elements such as the pickups require replacing however this is dependant on the players own tastes and bear in mind that Guitars electronics are still quality components and the original pickups will still produce a lovely tone.

Another reason to choose an Epiphone is that many well know guitar players have used Epiphones. Most famously the Beatles used Epiphones in the late 1960’s specifically the Epiphone Casino. Other famous users of Epiphone’s include The Edge (u2) ,BB King, Noel Gallagher, The Beatles, Paul Weller and Slash. So if you want to sound like your guitar hero an Epiphone is a wise choice.

These days the Epiphone brand produces a variety of high grade guitars from Archtops such as the Epiphone Wildkat, a range of Les Paul guitars through to re-issues of it’s Beatles classics the Casino and the Texan. Each of these has rich character great sounds and a unique heritage. And the guitars produced cover most music styles from Jazz to heavy metal

Playing an Epiphone surely isn’t a compromise, despite the differences with Gibson they are still classic instruments with solid tone. You will however notice the price difference – Epiphone guitars are clearly aimed at those with less bucks to spend than their Gibson cousins. They are however seriously good guitars. So if your about to buy an Electric Guitar be sure to check out an Epiphone first.

For more information on Epiphone Electric Guitars check out Epiphone.com

The Beatles and Epiphone Guitars

The Beatles may well be arguably the worlds biggest ever band. Musically from the early 1960’s to the end of their career they covered an array of different music styles from the jangly pop of their early days to the psychedelia of their latter albums. To cover all these different sounds they needed a broad range of instruments.

Throughout their career they used a variety of guitars and you can see many photographs of the Beatles with Rickenbacker’s (325’s in particular) various Gretch, Fender and Hofner. However they are also linked with Epiphone Guitars and often choose Epiphone guitars over all other guitars for recordings and live performances.

The first Beatle to own an Epiphone guitar was Paul McCartney who bought his first, an Epiphone Casino, during 1964. Influenced by the sound of this guitar John and George bought theirs soon after. The Epiphone Casino is a hollow-body double cutaway electric guitar. Although available in a variety of colors, George Harrison stripped his down to bare wood saying that he liked the sound of the guitar being able to breathe.

John Lennon favored the Epiphone E230TD Casino and used a variety of these guitars from 1966 onwards. Lennon painted this guitar and it appeared during the White Album sessions and in the Film “Let it Be”. During that film Lennon can be seen playing his Casino while rehearsing new material. Lennon’s Casino also features during the celebrated performance on the London roof top of their office building. Lennon is synonymous with the Casino, so much so that Epiphone recently re-released a John Lennon signature Casino. This faithful reproduction is of the guitar as John originally purchased it with the vintage sunburst finish and stock hardware.

The Beatles also used Epiphone’s acoustic guitars. Paul McCartney favored the Epiphone Texan acoustic guitar and it was used to record the epic track Yesterday. McCartney still uses Texan’s to this day.

Clearly the Beatles have been one of the (if not the) biggest influences in popular music over the last 50 years. Their sound was distinct and this was bought about both by their playing and their selection of instruments. Thier Epiphone guitars contributed to their sound and a number of guitars have become iconic in their association with arguably the worlds biggest band.

For more information visit Epiphone.com

Fender Guitars – Fender Serial Numbers

Like Many manufacturers – Fender place a serial number on their instruments to identify the finished article. Over the years the serial number has changed a few times.The Serial Number is accompanied by thepart number.Modern fender part numbers are in the format PPP-MMMM, where PPP is the code for the manufacturing plant and MMMM is the number. On Fenders the serial number traditionally appears at the butt end of the heel of the guitar neck. Fender, however, have not always been consistent and there are examples where it has been placed in different areas or simply omitted. Because of this, neck dating is useful in roughly determining the age of a guitar, but it is certainly not definitive.

There’s some excellent information out on the web when trying to decipher Fender Guitar serial numbers, for starters try Fender.com followed by http://www.provide.net/~cfh/fender.html which has put together an awesome article on the variations Fender have used with their serial numbering over the years. For starters take a look at the following table which illustrates some of the serial numbers used by Fender.

SERIAL NUMBERS

PRODUCTION DATES

Up to 6000

1950 to 1954

Up to 10,000

1954 to 1956

10,000s

1955 to 1956

10,000s to 20,000s

1957

20,000s to 30,000s

1958

30,000s to 40,000s

1959

40,000s to 50,000s

1960

50,000s to 70,000s

1961

60,000s to 90,000s

1962

80,000s to 90,000s

1963

90,000s up to L10,000s

1963

L10,000s up to L20,000s

1963

L20,000s up to L50,000s

1964

L50,000s up to L90,000s

1965

100,000s

1965

100,000s to 200,000s

1966 to 1967

200,000s

1968

200,000s to 300,000s

1969 to 1970

0,000s

1971 to 1972

300,000s to 500,000s

1973

400,000s to 500,000s

1974 to 1975

500,000s to 700,000s

1976

76 + 5 DIGITS
S6 + 5 DIGITS

1976

S7 + 5 DIGITS
S8 + 5 DIGITS

1977

S7 + 5 DIGITS
S8 + 5 DIGITS
S9 + 5 DIGITS

1978

S9 + 5 DIGITS
E0 + 5 DIGITS

1979

S9 + 5 DIGITS
E0 + 5 DIGITS
E1 + 5 DIGITS

1980

S9 + 5 DIGITS
E0 + 5 DIGITS
E1 + 5 DIGITS

1981

EI + 5 DIGITS
E2 + 5 DIGITS
E3 + 5 DIGITS
V + 4, 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1982
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

E2 + 5 DIGITS
E3 + 5 DIGITS
V + 4, 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1983
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

E3 + 5 DIGITS
E4 + 5 DIGITS
V + 4, 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1984
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

E3 + 5 DIGITS
E4 + 5 DIGITS
V + 4, 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1985
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

V + 4, 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1986
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

E4 + 5 DIGITS
V + 4, 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1987
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

E4 + 5 DIGITS
E8 + 5 DIGITS
V + 4, 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1988
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

E8 + 5 DIGITS
E9 + 5 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1989
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

E9 + 5 DIGITS
N9 + 5 DIGITS
N0 + 5 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1990
(For U.S. Vintage Series, check neck date for specific year)

N0 + 5 DIGITS
N1 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1991

N1 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
N2 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1992

N2 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
N3 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1993

N3 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
N4 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1994


N4 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
N5 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1995

N5 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
N6 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1996

N6 + 6 or 6 DIGITS
N7 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (U.S. Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1997

N7 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
N8 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series)

1998


N9 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

1999
1999

N9 + 5 or 6 DIGITS

Z0 + 5 or 6 DIGITS

DZ0 + 5 or 6 DIGITS (Am. Deluxe)

V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

2000

Z0 + 5 or 6 DIGITS

Z1 + 5 or 6 DIGITS

DZ1 + 5 or 6 DIGITS (Am. Deluxe)

V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

2001

Z1 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
Z2 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
DZ2 + 5 or 6 DIGITS (Am. Deluxe)
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

2002

Z2 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
Z3 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
DZ3 + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Deluxe Series)
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)

2003

Z3 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
Z4 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
DZ4 + 5 or 6 DIGITS (Am. Deluxe)
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)
XN4 + 4 Digits

2004

Z4 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
Z5 + 5 or 6 DIGITS
DZ5 + 5 or 6 DIGITS (Am. Deluxe)
V + 5 or 6 DIGITS (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster)
XN5 + 4 Digits

Getting a great Blues Guitar tone – Part One

Part one – A beginner’s guide to choosing the right guitar, amps and effects for blues.
First things first – Blues is such a vast genre of music that Blues tones mean different things to different people – whether it’s the raw tone of BB King through to the overdriven tones of Clapton during his Bluesbreakers periods or to Robert Johnson’s acoustic tones – they are all blues but all sound very different – in the first part of this series in getting a great blues tone we’ll look at what you need to think about stating off in the world of blues – which guitar should you look to using, which amp and what effects considerations you’ll need to make. In subsequent articles we’ll look at some of the most well known players and examine their rigs and get to the bottom of their sound. However remember that the blues comes out of you. The blues can only be bought with time and sweat, gear will only get your part of the way!

Which guitar for Blues?
This one’s a question of personal taste, and the blues genre that your interested in – but for electric blues for most it’ll come down to either a Fender Stratocaster or Gibson Les Paul (or replica’s depending on the budget). Stratocasters produce that clean sparkly tone (think Clapton, Robert Cray), while the Les Paul (Jimmy Page) will produce a rawer edgier sound (great for rock blues)

Remember to try out some hollow bodies (think BB King and his Gibson 335) – there are some great tones to be had from the latest Epiphones (Dot studio for example) – we find the hollowbodies give a much woodier earthy tone than hard bodies and usually a lot more sustain – however it’s down to personal preference. Also remember that heavier strings produce a stronger tone so you may want something a little different from the usual 10 gauge. And for a real authentic sound – ditch the wang bar – go for a fixed bridge.

The type of pickup used can heavily influence the sound produced – personally we adore the sound of a P90 pickup – however for a more rockier blues sound check out some Humbuckers (but unless you want a real overdriven tone – don’t opt for too higher an output).

The Amp
Tube all the way – for a natural warm tone capable of producing that raw emotion look for a suitable Tube driven amp. There’s loads out on the market – for authenticity try something like a Fender Twin or Fender Pro. For those wanting a little more grunt – look at the range of Marshall combos (Try Marshall JCM 800 combo). If your space conscious and don’t want to upset the neighbors too much look at the range of amp modeling processors out there – companies such as Line 6 (www.line6.com) manufacture units that can produce some great sounds.

The Effects
For most they’ll want a clean tone – simply plugged into the amp utilizing it’s own overdrive (Just a little overdrive is usually perfect) and a little reverb.– for others a separate overdrive pedal matched with a crybaby wah wah pedal will produce fine results. Remember for true authentic electric blues don’t push it into metal territory – blues requires an articulate touch and too much drive destroys the clarity and voice of the guitar – great for some styles but not necessarily for blues.

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